AFFIRMATIVE AND NEGATIVE AGREEMENT

AFFIRMATIVE AND NEGATIVE AGREEMENT

Exercise-1

Use So … ? Neither … in the following sentences.
Example: I’m feeling tired. — So am I.
I don’t like eggs. — Neither do I.

1. I need a holiday.
2. I don’t like milk.
3. I couldn’t get up this morning.
4. I’d love a cup of tea.
5. I’ve never been to Africa.
6.I was ill yesterday.
7. I should smoke less.
8. I spent the whole evening watching television.
9. I didn’t know that Ann was in hospital.
1. So do I. 4. So would I. 7. So should I.
2. Neither do I. 5. Neither have I. 8. So did I.
3. Neither could I. 6. So was I. 9. Neither did I.

AFFIRMATIVE AND NEGATIVE AGREEMENT

Exercise-2

Correct mistakes in these sentences.

1. We are going to the concert, and so do they.
2. She hasn’t finished the assignment yet, and neither I have.
3. He likes to travel, and so is she.
4. I didn’t know the answer, and he didn’t neither.
5. I am worried about it, and also is he.
6. If Jane won’t go to the party, either will he.
7. Mary wants to go home, and so want we.
8. She is not in agreement, and neither do I.
9. She took pictures, and I did so.
10. He won’t be here today, and either his sister will.
11. California relies heavily on income from fruit crops, and Florida is as well.
12. This table is not sturdy enough to support a television, and that one probably isn’t
neither.
13. Harvey seldom pays his bills on time, and his brother does too.
14.They are going to leave soon, and so do we.
15. They are planning on attending the convention next month, and so I am.
16. Pioneer men and women endured terrible hardships, and neither did the children.
1. so are they / they are too 10. neither will his sister / his sister
2. neither have I/I haven’t either won’t either
3. so does she/she does too 11. so does Florida / Florida does too
4. neither did he / he didn’t either 12. isn’t either
5. so is he / he is too 13. doesn’t either
6. neither will he / he won’t either 14. so are we / we are too
7. so do we / we do too 15. so am I /1 am too
8. neither am I / I’m not either 16. so did the children
9. so did I / I did too

AFFIRMATIVE AND NEGATIVE AGREEMENT

Affirmative & Negative Agreement, Negation, Commands

Affirmative Agreement

When indicating that one person pr thing does something and then adding that another does the same. Use the word so or too. To avoid needless repetition of words from the affirmative statement, use the conjunction and followed by a simple statement using so or too. The order of this statement will depend on whether so or too is used.
When a form of the verb be is used in the main clause, the same tense of the verb be is used in the simple statement that follows.
affirmative statement (be) + and + subject + verb (be) + too
so + verb (be) + subject
e.g. I am happy. You are happy
– I am happy and you are too
– I am happy and so are you

When a compound verb (auxiliary + verb), for example, will go, should do, has done, have written, must examine, etc. occurs in the main clause, the auxiliary of the main verb is used in the simple statement, and the subject and verb must agree.

Affirmative statement + and + subject + auxiliary only + too
so + auxiliary only + subject
e.g. They will work in the lab tomorrow. You will work in the lab tomorrow.
– They will work in the lab tomorrow and you will too
– They will work in the lab tomorrow and so will you

When any verb except be appears without any auxiliaries in the main clause, the auxiliary do, does, or did is used in simple statement. The subject and verb must agree and the tense must be the same.

Affirmative statement + and + subject + do, does, or did + too
(single verb except be) so + do, does, or did + subject
e.g. Jane goes to that school. My sister goes to school
– Jane goes to school and my sister does too
– Jane goes to school and so does my sister

Negative Agreement

Either and Neither function in simple statements much like so and too in affirmative sentences. However, either and neither are used to indicate negative agreement. The same rules for auxiliaries, be and do, does, or did apply.
Negative statement + and + subject + negative auxiliary or be + either
neither + positive auxiliary + subject
e.g. I didn’t see Mary this morning. John didn’t see Mary this morning.
– I didn’t see Mary this morning and John didn’t either
– I didn’t see Mary this morning and neither did John
She hasn’t seen the movie yet. I haven’t seen the movie yet.
– she hasn’t seen the movie yet and I haven’t either
– she hasn’t seen the movie yet and neither have .

Negation

To make a sentence negative, add the negative particle not after the auxiliary or verb be. If there is no auxiliary or be, add the appropriate form of do, does, or did and place in word not after that.
e.g.
John is rich John is not rich
Mark has seen Bill Mark has not seen Bill
The following examples contain no auxiliary and thus use do, does, or did.
e.g.
Marvin likes spinach Marvin does not like spinach
They went to class They did not go to class

Some/any

If there is a noun in the complement of a negative sentence, one should add the particle any before the noun.
Some affirmative sentences
Any negative sentences and question
e.g. John has some money
John doesn’t have any money

Hardly, barely, rarely, seldom, etc.

Remember that in an English sentence it is usually incorrect to have two negatives together. This is called a double negative and is not acceptable in standard English. The following words have a negative meaning and, thus, must be used with a positive verb
Hardly almost nothing
Barely mean or
Scarcely almost not at all
Rarely
Seldom mean almost never
Hardly ever
e.g.
She scarcely remembers the accident (she almost doesn’t remember the accident)
We seldom see phone of these animals (we almost never see photos of these animals)

Commands

A command is an imperative statement. One person orders another to do something. It can be preceded by please. The understood subject is you. Use the simple form of the verb.
Close the door leave the room
Please turn off the light Open your book
Negative commands: A negative command is formed by adding the word don’t before the verb.
Don’t close the door
Please don’t turn off the light
Indirect commands: Usually the verbs order, ask, tell, or say are used to indicate an indirect command. They are followed by the infinitive (to + verb).
Jack asked Jill to turn off the light
The policeman ordered the suspect to be quite
Negative Indirect commands: to make an indirect command negative, add the particle not before the infinitive.
Subject + verb + complement + not + (verb in infinitive)
e.g.
The teacher told Christopher not to open the window
Please tell Jeime not to leave the room.

Questions and Answers:

Rose likes to fly, and her brother does too.
They will leave at noon, and I will too.
He has an early appointment, and so do I.
She has already written her composition, and so have her friends.
Their plane is arriving at nine o’clock, and so is mine.
The children shouldn’t take that medicine, and neither should she.
We don’t plan to attend the concert, and neither do they.
I don’t like tennis, and he doesn’t either.
They won’t have to work on weekends, and we won’t either.
That scientist isn’t too happy with the project, and neither are her supervisors.

Affirmative and Negative Agreement

In daily-life language use, there is a lot of work that is done by one person and repeated the same action by another person. In this case, we need to use particular words or formula to express the words in most appropriate and precise way. So, we use different words and rules to avoid unnecessary repetition of words which is known as Affirmative and Negative Agreement.

Affirmative Agreement:

When mentioning that one person or thing does something and again that another does the same, we use the word so or too. By using conjunction and, followed by a simple statement using so or too we can avoid unnecessary repetition of words from the affirmative sentences. The array of this statement will rely on whether so or too is used.

1. In the main clause, if a form of the verb be is used then the same tense of the verb be will be used in the simple statement that follows.

  Affirmative statement + and +  subject + verb (be) + too
  (be)  so + verb (be) + subject

Examples:

– I am happy. You are happy.
– I am happy, and you are too.
– I am happy, and so are you.
2. In the main clause, when a compound verb (auxiliary + verb), for example, will go, should do, has done, have written, must examine, etc. comes, the auxiliary of the main verb is used in the simple statement, and the subject and verb must agree.
  Affirmative statement (compound verb) + and +  subject +  only auxiliary + too
 so +  only auxiliary + subject

 Examples:

– They will work in the lab tomorrow. You will work in the lab tomorrow.
– They will work in the lab tomorrow, and you will too.
– They will work in the lab tomorrow, and so will you.
3. In the main clause, when any verb except be comes without any auxiliaries, the auxiliary do, does, or did is used in the simple statement. The tense must be the same and the subject and verb must agree.
  Affirmative statement + and + subject + do, does, or did + too
  (single verb except be) so + do, does, or did + subject

 Examples:

– Jane goes to that school. My sister goes to school.
– Jane goes to school and my sister does too.
– Jane goes to school and so does my sister.

AFFIRMATIVE AND NEGATIVE AGREEMENT

Online Quiz

AFFIRMATIVE AND NEGATIVE AGREEMENT